Sir Michael

Michael Palin’s knighthood did not come as a total surprise to me. I heard rumors in recent weeks from rather reliable sources, so when the official announcement came, it was not a shock.

Still, the news that Michael would become a real-life k…nigget is a little amazing, yet completely Pythonesque. Knowing him over the past 40 years, and seeing him play one of the Knights Who Say Ni, there was little reason to think that it would ever happen. The Pythons were never particularly respectful of the Royals in the traditional British sense, and never took it all very seriously.

On the other hand, it makes complete sense. Once Michael began introducing TV viewers to the rest of the world, he took a step further from Python, and a step closer to the sort of chap that would become a knight.

And of all the Pythons, who better than Michael? John and Eric have been spending less and less time in Britain. Terry Jones never showed any inclination toward such an award. Graham is, unfortunately, dead. And Terry Gilliam—even worse—insisted on spending the majority of his life as an American.

So why not Michael? He has spent years as a respectable author and documentarian, distancing himself enough from Python that the Royals could overlook his portrayal of Sir Galahad and the leader of the Knights Who Say Ni, and encounters with the Pantomime Princess Margaret, enough to make him a real knight.

So congratulations Sir Michael! You have made this American very proud of you and your career. And best of all, I know that the next time we meet, you’ll be the same old Michael.#montypython #michaelpalin

2 thoughts on “Sir Michael

  1. Mark Dillman

    Congratulations to Michael. Thank you for being the first to inform me! Our passion for Monty Python and its amazing members will clearly last throughout our lives.

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